Weed Anatomy 101

TRICHOMES: Trichomes have the highest concentration of THC in the plant. These resinous glands are reflective and potent. Good weed is often covered in Trichomes that can easily be seen when the bud is brought under light. This resin is used to produce hash and other concentrates.

CALYX/FLOWER: Calyces makes up the majority of bud. Calyces have the highest concentration of THC and are coated in trichomes. The calyx is what we smoke and what we call ‘flower.’

COLA: The Cola is the section of the plant considered most desirable. This is the part of the plants that grow buds and flowers, and eventually becomes the weed we smoke.

BRACT/PISTIL/STIGMA: Pistils are little hairlike strands that catch pollen to begin the process of reproduction. While they contain no THC, they are important indicators of the gender and maturity of a plant. Pistils are often brightly colored and are important to the visual composition of weed.

STALK: Stalks are made up of fibers that can be  used in hemp products all the way from fabrics to rope.

FAN LEAVES: The iconic leaves that every stoner knows. These leaves are often discarded after harvest as they contain the smallest amount of THC in the plant.

SUGAR LEAVES: Sugar leaves are high in THC. After trimming, these leaves are used to make edibles or full flower concentrates.

STEM: The stem provides structure to the plant. It contains a little bit of THC and can be used in full flower extracts and tinctures.

 

 

GERMINATION  1-2 WEEKS
The cannabis plant begins with a tiny seed. Mature and viable seeds tend to be dark brown and dry. There are a lot of farms that use clones rather than seeds to fill out their crop. At this point the seed has not been planted in soil, but is kept in a cool damp place.

SEEDLING  2-3 WEEKS
The seed is transferred to soil or another nutrient medium. At this stage the plant requires the most light. The seed leaves (cotyledon) and fans leaves begin to grow at this point.

CLONING
Farmers take trimmings from the cannabis plant, and by providing the right conditions for these cuttings, get them to grow roots and begin the plant life cycle again. This process allows farmers to grow plants with specific characteristics, without having to rely on chance when growing from seeds.

VEGETATIVE  2-8 WEEKS
At this stage the plant grows tall and wide to provide structure to support the heavy buds that will grow later. The plants show signs of gender late into this stage, and farmers will remove male plants from their crop. Clones are often taken at this stage as well.

FLOWERING  6-8 WEEKS
This is the most demanding and intricate section of the growing process. As change in the amount of sunlight and darkness in the seasons occurs, the flowering process begins. With an explosion of growth, the plant changes from growing leaves to growing buds. If properly raised these buds will be dense, richly colored, and most importantly, covered in resin.

HARVESTING
As the pistils start to turn red, the stems broaden, the resin gets brown and darker, and the leaves start to curl up and turn yellow. The branches are cut and the leaves trimmed.

DRYING  4-10 DAYS
These stalks are hung to dry for about one to two weeks. The drying process produces a bud that smokes more evenly and retains potency longer.

CURING  3 WEEKS
Once properly dried, the weed is  removed from the stem and put in airtight containers that help to   preserve the potency and quality of the bud.

Intro To Joints

For many smokers, its the last resort. For many more stoners its a skill that they never picked up. But knowing how to roll a good joint is the key to stoner heaven. Whether you are hiking through the mountains or chiefing on a walk, a joint is the perfect companion, and great for sharing (not right now though.). While there are going to be a few ‘doobies’ rolled on the road to a perfection, a little practice and a little patience will get you a home-rolled joint burning between your fingertips in a second. So we put together a simple 12 step guide to help you perfect your joint rolling skills.

Whether you’re rolling your joint on your dinner table or on a book while you’re at the beach, its always helpful to have a wide, clean, smooth surface to roll on. If you plan on making joints a habit you might invest in a weed tray with tilted edges, but you can make do with a book or a bowl just as well.

Grab a few nugs, try to aim for about 3/4 of a gram. Don’t grind it too fine or it will be harder to roll with. You’ll start to get the amount you need down, but even if you over shoot by a little, you would be surprised by how much weed you can pack into a well rolled joint.

Bend one end of the papers between your pointer finger and thumb of your non-dominant hand. The paper has a glue edge, make sure it is putting up, and towards you.. At this point you can place a crutch on the paper under your pointer finger, but they aren’t necessary.

Pour your ground weed onto your paper, starting at your finger tip and working up. Try to leave as few gaps as possible so the flower is dense, even if that means cutting your joint a little short. Gaps will cause your joint to canoe, burning poorly and wasting weed.

Using both thumbs, massage the weed with a rocking pattern. Start at the edges, and work your way in, slowly and lightly massaging the weed. Tails will begin to form as you do this. The shape to aim for is a cone. Don’t compress the weed too much because it will be hard to draw through when smoked.

As the cone shape forms, stop rolling and fill in any gaps in the roll. Massage the weed into the cone shape. Well rolled weed is fluffy, rather than densely packed. Although if the weed is too lightly rolled it will burn unevenly. Any gaps in the weed will cause it to canoe and can ruin your joint.

With your non-dominant thumb, push the paper tip of the paper closest to you under the thin section of your weed. If you have trouble tucking, you can bend the paper so that it is flush with other-side. Use your finger to jam this section down so there is no gap.

From the bottom up, lick the glued edge. From the bottom up apply the now wet edge to the dry paper. Run your finger over the seam and leave the joint be for a minute so that it can dry. You do not need to use much saliva to make the seal, but be sure there are no air gaps.

Any weed left on your plate can be packed into the top of the joint. Twist the open paper shut, pressing down the weed. A pen or pencil eraser is a great tool for packing. Don’t pack too much, because the weed can become too dense to smoke through and the paper can tear. But you would be surprised how much you can get in there.

Grab a business card or some card-stock and cut it to about the width of your fingertip. Any paper can work, but something tough gives the joint a little structure. You can tear it too, although frayed edges can clog up your joint.

Bend a short zig-zag into your crutch paper. Wrap the rest of the paper around the zig-zag so that you form a cylinder. It shouldn’t be too tight or too loose. It is meant to catch weed from falling in your mouth, and to give you something to hold on to and pass around.

Tighten your crutch slightly and slide it into the unsealed side of your joint. You’ll probably be pushing weed, so be slow in pushing the crutch into your joint so that you do not tear the paper or pack the weed too tightly under your crutch. Now it is…

The Hemporer

Who in the Weed was

Jack Herer?

Food, Fiber, Fuel, Fun, Medicine.

The legal access to weed we enjoy now, for most modern smokers, is new. And while the trend sweeps the nation, and national legalization is on our doorstep, it’s important to look back at some of the figures who got us there. Legalization is a movement that has pushed against the U.S. and international prohibition, and one of the biggest voices in the history of this movement was Jack Herer. You might know more about the strain than its namesake. A spicy and citrus-sativa perfect for getting stuff done, reflecting the nature of the man himself.

A fiery hemp activist, Herer was born in 1939, and grew up in Buffalo, New York. He was the youngest of three kids. He served in the Korean war, then moved to making a living off painting signs. Jack got into cannabis in his early 30s, gave up painting, and opened a head shop on Venice Beach. It’s said that it was his girlfriend who got him to smoke because, “He was too boring otherwise.”

Herer wrote his book The Emperor Wears No Clothes in 1985. It was born from Herer’s passion for the plant, a compilation of uses and benefits of cannabis, and data, statistics and accounts that supported legalization. He narrates the devastation of the planet from climate change while he expresses the many solutions that cannabis has to offer. He presents solutions to medical conditions, promoting the use of cannabis for pain management and its anti-anxiety properties.

Jack Herer promoted the idea of the entire plant, not just the dried flower, being useful for addressing the problems that we as the world face. He worked to reveal the diverse and far-reaching history of cannabis through societies. Dating back at the earliest to 8,000 B.C. cannabis has had a powerful impact. Herer tracked the course it took in America, from being one of the most abundant and accessible medicines on the frontier, to the huge number of farms and plantations in the states, some of which were regulated to grow more cannabis in times of scarcity.

Herer died in April of 2010 at the age of 70. After a later-life of fighting off heart-attacks, he finally succumbed to the final big one after giving a speech in Portland, Oregon. He would die months later due to the lingering damage. But the movement did not die with him. As an eternal testament to his lifelong pursuit, the back cover of The Emperor Wears No Clothes challenges readers to disprove the fact, with a bet of $100,000, that cannabis is essential to answer the problems that face the world.

Intro to Joint Rolling

WEED BIO 101

From the iconic fan leaves to the potent trichomes, the weed plant that we partake in is complex. A little bit of understanding of cannabis biology is helpful to find which strains, products, and farms are right for you. So to help with that, we at Tacoma House of Cannabis put together a brief introduction to Cannabis biology.